Mumbai Building Collapse: Death Toll Rises To Four, Many Trapped Under Debris

by
Sheena
A portion of a five-storey residential building collapsed in Mumbai on Monday as fire officials and locals rushed for rescue operations, with most residents still feared to be trapped under the rubble.

A portion of a five-storey residential building collapsed in Mumbai on Monday as fire officials and locals rushed for rescue operations, with most residents still feared to be trapped under the rubble.

According to locals and eyewitnesses the residential building, located near the Mahim shrine in Mumbai, collapsed around 8:15 pm.

"This was a five-storey building and this accident happened around 8:15 pm (local time) at night. I was at my friend's place, which is the adjoining building, close to a shrine. We heard a huge noise and we thought an accident had taken place. When we got out to see there was a lot of dust, I thought there has been a blast but when the cloud of dust cleared we found that a building had collapsed and people were trapped inside," said Shehzad Khan, a local.

Media reports suggested that nearly 20 people were trapped under the rubble of cement and steel, but locals said that around 100 residents lived in the building.

"At least 100 people must be living in this building, or somewhere, between 80 and 100," Khan added.

BBC reports, at least four people have been killed and six others are left injured.

More than five fire trucks rushed to the scene of the accident and with the assistance of locals and cranes started to clear out the debris and look for survivors.

The heavy monsoon rains in the city have hindered the rescue operations

Many Indian buildings do not conform to safety regulations, with owners constructing extra floors or structures without approval from the concerned authorities and beyond the sanctioned floor space index (FSI) or floor area ration (FAR).

Just In April, a building collapse in Bangladesh took more than 1,100 lives that raised question from all over the globe on safety standards in Bangladesh's booming garment industry.

Read more about it over here.

 

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