Nestle Comes Under Fire For Joking About The Massacre In Mexico

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This is way beyond insensitive. At a time when thousands of people in Mexico are storming government buildings and setting their gates on fire.

This is perhaps the worst possible social media mess-up a brand could have made.

On Friday, Mexico finally learned that the 43 student-teachers from the small town of Ayotzinapa, who went missing in September, were indeed murdered and burned by drug mafia, aided by law enforcement and government officials.

Following the damning revelation, angry demonstrators took to the streets, demanding justice for the ruthlessly killed victims and their grieving families.

The country, to put it briefly, is going through one of its most (politically) critical phases where people have lost faith in both their government and security agencies.

However, someone working for one of the world's top food companies failed to realize the seriousness of it all and poked fun at the tragedy in a tweet which is now being branded "tasteless" and "insensitive" – and rightfully so.

A Mexican account dedicated to Nestle's candy bar posted the following tweet on Sunday, likening its product "Crunch" to the massacre of the 43 students.

“A los de Ayotzinapa les dieron Crunch,” read the now-deleted tweet, a pun that plays on a Mexican slang term used when someone is beaten up. It loosely translates into “They crunched those from Ayotzinapa.”

Recommended: Mexico Has Finally Exploded

Predictably, the Internet exploded in protest over it, with many calling for a boycott of Nestle products.

Although the brand issued an official apology and took down the tweet, no details have been provided as to who wrote it and approved it.

"We have apologized for this completely unacceptable tweet which is entirely contrary to the values of our company,” a Nestle spokesman told press reporters this week.

"We deeply regret any distress it may have caused. We understand and share the public's concern about this post. We take this matter extremely seriously."

Related: Here’s What You Need To Know About The “Missing Students” Protests In Mexico

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