Here’s Why Nestle Refuses To Stop Bottling In Drought-Hit California

Sameera Ehteram
Nestle faces wrath for refusing to pack up its bottling operation from drought-hit California.


As the drought enters the fourth year in California, bottled water plants in the state are facing a lot of flak. Nestle, with five bottling plants in California is no exception. Many residents are fed up with bottling plants that profit off the state's dwindling water supply.

Making the most of the severe drought in California Nestlé has been bottling 80 million gallons of California water a year and selling it back to the public at a ridiculous profit.

Read More: Nestlé Steals World’s Water Despite Historic Drought

As if it wasn’t outrageous enough, when asked whether he would ever consider moving his company's bottling operations out of California, Nestlé Waters North America CEO Tim Brown refused point blank.

 “Absolutely not – in fact, if I could increase it, I would,” he said.

"If I stop bottling water tomorrow," he went on to explain, "people would buy another brand of bottled water. As the second largest bottler in the state, we’re filling a role many others aren’t filling. It’s driven by consumer demand; it’s driven by an on-the-go society that needs to hydrate. Frankly, we’re very happy (consumers) are doing it in a healthier way.”

He may have a point, but people are in no mood for it:

Check Out: William Shatner Has The Solution To California's Drought

Nestle, however, did announce plans to reduce the amount of water it uses at bottled water plants and other factories in California and to invest in technology to save water at plants.

They said they were working to convert a milk factory in Modesto to a "zero water" plant that can extract all the water it needs from milk – quite similar to a plant that opened in Mexico last year.

"Like everyone else, we have to adapt, and so doing our part is really looking to how we can improve," said Jane Lazgin, a spokeswoman for Nestle Waters North America.

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