New Anti-Anxiety Drug Works By Targeting Same Brain Receptors As Marijuana

The COX-2 inhibitor has shown to relieve anxious behavior in test mice, and may soon go on to treat or cure anxiety in humans.

stress, anxiety, COX-2, Marijuana

 

Research at Vanderbilt University has led to exciting results regarding the modified inhibitor COX-2. The COX-2 inhibitor has shown to relieve anxious behavior in test mice, and may soon go on to treat or cure anxiety in humans. Perhaps more exciting to some, the COX-2 inhibitor works by activating the same brain receptors that marijuana does. This COX-2 research will be published in full in next week’s Natural Neuroscience journal.

The COX-2 inhibitor works by activating natural endocannabinoids within the body. These endocannabinoids then activate cannabinoid receptors in the brain. The cannabinoid sensors exist all throughout the brain and body, and are responsible for modulating stress and anxiety in humans. Like marijuana, COX-2 gets these receptors to trigger, leading to reduced stress and anxiety.

If this COX-2 inhibitor research proves effective in treating human anxiety, the inhibitor could go on to treat pain, movement disorder, and even help fight colon cancer.

But will it get you high?

"The door is really wide open," said Sachin Patel, who co-led the study with Lawrence Marnett, "We've just scratched the surface."

Unlike marijuana itself, which targets several other aspects of the brain and body than simply cannabinoid sensors, this COX-2 inhibitor will only cause the calming triggers to activate. The potential for such relief could mean much for mental and physical sufferers across the globe.

But will it get you high?

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