Newsweek Print Edition Back From The Dead

by
Sameera Ehteram
Newsweek, the renowned U.S. weekly current affairs magazine, announced in 2012 that they’ll be publishing their final print edition on Dec. 31 and moving to an all-digital format.

Newsweek, the renowned U.S. weekly current affairs magazine, announced in 2012 that they’ll be publishing their final print edition on Dec. 31 and moving to an all-digital format.

So when their ‘last’ print edition got published, people bid goodbye to an era. Though sad, many accepted it as a sign of changing times that are increasingly shifting from the hard copy to softer online versions.

But Newsweek has now announced that they will be back in print with a 64-page weekly edition early in the coming year.

According to Newsweek’s editor-in-chief, Jim Impoco, the plan is to depend more on subscribers than advertisers to pay its bills, with readers paying more than the past.

Impoco told the New York Times he hoped Newsweek could build the circulation of its print edition to 100,000 in its first year back.

The news is a welcoming one, and there is generally a positive feedback:

 

 

But the development makes one wonder what caused the editors to reverse their decision.

According to the Audit Bureau of Circulation, Newsweek’s total paid circulation had fell from 3,158,480 in 2001 to 1,527,157 in June 2012 and that’s probably one of the main reasons they stopped publishing in print. Many predict that the print media’s days are numbered and are questioning the wisdom of Newsweek’s decision.

At the same time as Newsweek plans to come back in print, others have been tapering off their print publication. New York Magazine is a prime example. They printed just 42 issues this year and in coming March, it will switch to a biweekly schedule.

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