Escaped Girls Tell Harrowing Stories From Inside Boko Haram’s Camp

Sameera Ehteram
Some 53 of the 200 plus Nigerian girls abducted by terrorist group Boko Haram were brave enough to escape. The harrowing accounts of their ordeal will give you goose bumps.

Boko Haram militants stormed an all-girl secondary school in the village of Chibok, in Borno state in Nigeria last month and kidnapped more than 200 girls.  According to police, 53 girls had escaped from the gunmen while 276 remained missing.

Imagine the horror that these girls must have gone through.  

We can only learn their true state once they are hopefully freed from the madman and his team of terrorists, but some of the kidnapped girls who were able to escape,  have some very disturbing stories.  

Check Out: 10 Photos Capturing The Heartbreak And Anger Over Kidnapped Nigerian Girls

They tell how the gunmen commanded hundreds of students to gather outside the school and went into a storeroom and took all the food. The girls were put to work as soon as they reached their first stop, a camp in the forest near a village called Baale. Some of them were put to work cooking the looted food and took others at gunpoint to carry water.

"They then moved all of us to the main gate and brought their cars where they loaded the food they had taken and asked us to get in," one of the girls recalled.

"The girls that had no shoes on and were not wearing veils were told to go and fetch them as they started to set the school on fire."

A sixteen-year-old chosen for the cooking duty recalls her escape, “My mind was busy, thinking of a way to escape,” she said. “I and two other girls were close together, speaking softly, and we came up with a plan.” But they were surrounded with armed guards.

The girls told the gunmen they needed to relieve themselves and were allowed to walk into the bush.

“As soon as we were out of sight of the gunmen, we fled and we ran for about two hours,” she says.

Another girl said she and a few other girls made a run for it when they were sent to fetch water.  “Even when they were shooting at us, we took the chance and Gold helped us arrive in Chibok two days later.”

19-year-old Sarah Lawan one of the girls who managed to escape says the experience is “too terrifying for words” and that she is scared to go back to school.

“I am pained that my other colleagues could not summon the courage to run away with me,” she laments. But she also realizes how difficult it was as the kidnappers kept threatening to shoot anyone who tried to run away. “I cry each time I come across their parents and see how they weep when they see me.”

InitiallyBoko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau said he would sell them but later released a video demanding the release of Boko Haram prisoners for the girls. The video showed about 130 girls dressed in Muslim attire reciting something in Arabic and Shekau proudly claimed to have them converted to Islam.

The video is extremely disturbing. The feeling of relief on seeing the girls alive is overpowered by the thoughts of what they might be going through