Grieving Father's 'Not One More' Gun Violence Challenge Hits 1 Million Mark

Lauren Burgoon
Americans demand 'Not One More' death from gun violence after the deaths at University of California, Santa Barbara. Where's the action from politicians?

Even as he's grieving his murdered son, Richard Martinez is starting a movement in America: Not One More.

Not One More innocent person killed from gun violence. Not One More family left to weep as Americans are murdered and politicians do little to address gun control, violence and mental health issues. 

Not One More gun death.

Martinez's son, Christopher, was one of six victims killed in the murderous rampage at University of California, Santa Barbara by Elliot Rodger, who promised "retribution" for a lifetime of perceived slights. 

Martinez immediately began speaking out after the shootings, his grief almost unbearable to watch as he told politicians, "I don't care about your sympathy. I don't give a shit if you feel sorry for me. Get to work and do something."

At a rally just after the shooting, Martinez asked mourners to commit to sending politicians that message. Send a postcard, he urged, with just three words: Not One More.

The campaign surpassed the 1 million mark of postcards pledged. It's also taken over Twitter with #NotOneMore messages posted students, parents, activists and even politicians, including Santa Barbara's mayor.

Supporters can sign up to have messages sent to their governors, senators and House representatives. But the real question is, will any listen? After every mass shooting, Americans say "never again." It happened after Sandy Hook; after Columbine; after the Oak Creek, Wis., temple; after Aurora, Colo. 

Will Congress ever listen?