'Osama Home' Landowner Is Arrested

Pakistan has gone on the offensive insisting it shared key information about Osama bin Laden's compound up to two years ago with their American counterparts.

Pakistan 'Told US About Osama Home In 2009'

Police have reinstalled check points near the compound

Pakistan has gone on the offensive insisting it shared key information about Osama bin Laden's compound up to two years ago with their American counterparts.

Although the government and intelligence agency, ISI, transferred information about the residence it denies knowledge of the terror leader bin Laden being there.

A senior ISI source told me they got information that Osama's wife and sons were living at the compound in Abbottabad in the north-west of Pakistan, six months ago.

He insisted they shared this information with the CIA.

"It is as a result of the information we shared that they got Osama bin Laden," he told me.

The episode has strained an already fraught relationship between the two agencies.

The CIA and the US administration have long held suspicions that there are elements within the ISI who are supporting militant groups, including al Qaeda.

The prominent compound was built near a leading military academy

They believe an exchange of critical information before the navy Seal operation would have jeopardised their chances of success, that is, bin Laden would have been tipped off and escaped.

But the ISI sources I spoke to said this had only embarrassed the agency and undermined their relationship.

"The ISI has captured so many terrorists in operations we have organised and they should not be forgotten," he said.

"Our relationship will be affected because of the manner this was conducted.

"The Americans have always talked of leakage on our side," he went on, "they always say this without any basis."

The Pakistan foreign office has said it has "deep concerns and reservations" about the US operation which ended in the death of an unarmed bin Laden.

The government warned that the controversial operation should not set a precedent and may sometimes "constitute a threat to international peace and security".

Meanwhile, the compound has once again been sealed off for inspection and examination by a senior intelligence team and the head of the ISI, General Pasha, is believed to be intending to personally visit the site.

On Tuesday, the police opened up the compound and hundreds of residents gathered to see the home where bin Laden had apparently lived and died.

But today, check points have been re-imposed, with searches being undertaken of residents in the town.

The renewed security comes after the man who purchased the land in Pakistan where Osama bin Laden's compound was built, was arrested.

It is believe that Gul Mohammed was taken into custody by police and will be interrogated by intelligence agents about the property.

 

 

 

Sky News