Pakistan, US To Sign New Deal On Nato Supplies

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staff
Islamabad and Washington will soon formally sign a new agreement to regulate trucks carrying supplies for Nato troops in Afghanistan, the Foreign Office has said.

Oil tankers, which were used to transport NATO fuel supplies to Afghanistan, are parked, in Karachi, Pakistan, Monday, July 2. The Obama administration said Tuesday that Pakistan was reopening its supply lines into Afghanistan, after the US belatedly issued an apology for the November killing of 24 Pakistani troops in a NATO airstrike.

ISLAMABAD — Islamabad and Washington will soon formally sign a new agreement to regulate trucks carrying supplies for Nato troops in Afghanistan, the Foreign Office has said.

The vital overland routes reopened last week under old arrangements after US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton apologised on July 3 for the botched US air strikes that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers in November.

Foreign Ministry spokesperson Moazzam Ali Khan told reporters at his weekly news briefing that Pakistan and the United States had almost completed technical discussions, and officials were now consulting with their respective authorities to finalise the new accord.

“We are quite hopeful that a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) will be signed shortly,” the spokesman said.

The government decided to scrap the Musharraf-era war on terror agreements with the United States following the botched US strikes on Pakistani checkpoints near the border with Afghanistan.

Meanwhile, top military commanders huddled at the army’s General Headquarters (GHQ) in Rawalpindi on Thursday to discuss regional security, including the recent breakthrough in ties with the United States. The corps commanders’ meeting was chaired by army chief General Ashfaq Pervez Kayani, who briefed the meeting about his recent talks with Gen. John Allen, the top US commander in Afghanistan.

The commanders also discussed cross-border incursions by Pakistani militants, who have found safe havens in Afghanistan.