Pakistan Warns America Not To Stage Any More Raids

Pakistan has warned America of the

Pakistani police officers stand guard at the main gate of a house where al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden was caught and killed in Abbottabad, Pakistan on Wednesday, May 4, 2011. The residents of Abbottabad, Pakistan, were still confused and suspicious on Wednesday about the killing of Osama bin Laden, which took place in their midst before dawn on Monday.

ABBOTTABAD, Pakistan — Pakistan has warned America of the "disastrous consequences" if it carries out any other unilateral raids against suspected terrorists in its country.

The Pakistani army and the government have been criticized for Monday's raid on the compound of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, with many angry over the violation of the country's sovereignty and doubtful of government claims it was not aware of the raid.

Foreign Secretary Salman Bashir said Thursday "there shall not be any doubt that any repetition of such an act will have disastrous consequences."

Pakistan's Foreign Secretary Salman Bashir, right, addresses a news conference with U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan Marc Grossman, at the Foreign Office in Islamabad, Pakistan on Tuesday, May 3, 2011.

But Bashir declined to say whether the American raid was illegal and said relations between Pakistan and the United States remained on course, suggesting his comments were mostly aimed for domestic consumption.



THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

ABBOTTABAD, Pakistan — Pakistan's army chief is meeting with top commanders to discuss the U.S. raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

Both Pakistan and the United States have said that Islamabad was not involved in the helicopter-borne raid. Bin Laden was killed on Monday in a large house close to a military academy in the northwestern town of Abbottabad.

Pakistani police officers stand guard at the main gate of a house where al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden was caught and killed in Abbottabad, Pakistan on Wednesday, May 4, 2011. The residents of Abbottabad, Pakistan, were still confused and suspicious on Wednesday about the killing of Osama bin Laden, which took place in their midst before dawn on Monday.

The Pakistani army has so far not explained when and how it learned about the operation, or why it didn't take any action against the incursion of helicopters, which officials from both countries say took off from neighboring Afghanistan.

Pakistani officials say Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani may make a statement at the end of Thursday's meeting. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media.

AP