The Tale Of The Spanish Cyclist In Pakistan Shows Some Risks Are Too Grave To Take

by
Sameera Ehteram
Six guards, protecting Spanish round-the-world cyclist Javier Colorado, lost their lives when they were attacked by Gunmen on Wednesday in a remote area of western Pakistan.

Six guards, protecting Spanish round-the-world cyclist Javier Colorado, lost their lives when they were attacked by Gunmen on Wednesday in a remote area of western Pakistan.

Considering the region is known as a hunting ground for kidnappers, Taliban militants and kidnappers, apart from being plagued by widespread sectarian violence and a separatist insurgency, the 27-year-old cyclist must have known he was taking a grave risk. 

Colorado, who began his trip in Madrid on October 1st last year and traveled through Europe, Turkey and Iran, before crossing into Pakistan, was reportedly unhurt.

Colorado's family posted the following message on his Facebook page after the attack:

"This is a message from Javier Colorado's family. In the first place we want to thank the Spanish consulate in Pakistan for all their help. We've received a call from the embassy and they have informed us that Javier is well and not hurt. Today he will fly to Lahore, on the border with India. His initial intent is to continue his trip."

What made him decide to travel through that area of Pakistan is a question many are asking.

The province is riddled with kidnappers, Taliban militants, a violent separatist insurgency, sectarian killers, death squads and drug traffickers.

 

 

 

Two young Czech women taking the same route by bus were kidnapped in March last year and are still being held captive.

Just a day ago, a bomb targeted a bus full of Shi'ite pilgrims, killing 29, in the same district.

The guards were apparently a good deterrent but it was still too much of a chance. It did cost 6 lives.

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