Why The Car That Killed Paul Walker Was One Of The Most Dangerous On The Planet

by
Owen Poindexter
Paul Walker died in a car that was far more dangerous than anything most sane people would ever drive. The 2005 Porsche Carrera GT had a top speed of 208 MPH, and was very hard to handle.

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Paul Walker died in a car that could hit 208 MPH and was designed for racing. PHOTO: Andre Luis, CC License

Paul Walker died in a car that was far more dangerous than anything most sane people would ever drive. The 2005 Porsche Carrera GT had a top speed of 208 MPH. Only 1,300 were made, and they cost just under half a million dollars. The crash, which killed Paul Walker and driver Roger Rodas, did not involve any other cars, but it’s all too easy to imagine how the Porsche Carrera can get out of control quickly by itself.

A Car And Driver review described the 2005 Porsche Carrera GT like this:

“The 60-mph run isn't a sprint; it's simply a first stride in this car. It's gone in 3.5 seconds. A scant 3.3 seconds later, 100 mph arrives. By the time your brain has caught up with the ever-increasing velocity, the GT has passed 130 mph--in 10.8 seconds…

The review goes on to praise the steering handle on the car, but others have said that it’s a difficult car to drive safely, even for a professional.

Todd Trimble, an exotic car mechanic in Las Vegas, called the car that Walker and Rodas died in a "very hard car to drive."

"It's (a) pure racer's car,” Trimble added. “You really need to know what you're doing when you drive them. And a lot of people are learning the hard way."

In addition to its tremendous acceleration, fueled by a 600 horsepower, the car has no stability control, meaning it responds to every little touch on the gas pedal and steering wheel, and it is very unforgiving of mistakes.

Investigations into the death of Paul Walker and Roger Rodas are still ongoing, and we will know more soon. While the Porsche Carrera GT didn’t cause the deaths of Walker and Rodas, it made their deaths much more likely once a mistake was made. Safer driving would have saved Paul Walker and Roger Rodas, but a safer car may have as well.

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