President Obama’s First News Conference Post-Elections Victory

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editors
Eight days after his re-election and with multiple domestic and foreign issues looming, President Obama in his first news conference of second term had a clear cut message for reporters as well as for people. ‘I didn't re-elected just to bask in re-election. I got re-elected to do work.’

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Image From: Reuters

Eight days after his re-election and with multiple domestic and foreign issues looming, President Obama in his first news conference of second term had a clear cut message for reporters as well as for people. ‘I didn't re-elected just to bask in re-election. I got re-elected to do work.’

In his first Q&A session with White House reporters since March, the president provided a clear indication that there can be no compromise on taxes.

Apart from the fiscal cliff and tax problems President Obama also addressed the much heated issues of scandal that led to the resignation of CIA director David Petraeus and other foreign policy issues.

Here’s a look at some of them:

US will push for dialogue with Iran:

When asked about the way Obama looks its relations with Iran, the President said:

"I will try to make a push in coming months to see if we can open a dialogue" with Iran and the international community about that nation's nuclear ambitions, Obama says. "

“We're not going to let Iran get a nuclear weapon," he adds, but "there is still a window of time for us to resolve this diplomatically."

David Petraeus affair and threat to national security:

Obama sounded more defensive when talking about Petraeus scandal.

"I have no evidence, at this point ... that classified information was disclosed in any way that would have an impact on national security," he said.

When questioned whether he and American people should have been told before the Election Day about the investigation of Petraeus, Obama said that he will let the FBI determine whether its notification protocols were followed.

US support conditions for Syrian opposition

When asked about whether US will arm Syrian opposition against Syrian President Bashar al Assad, he said that the recent formation of coalition of opponents is encouraging. However, to seek US support the opposition forces must be "committed to a democratic Syria, an inclusive Syria, a moderate Syria."

During the entire press conference President Obama seemed confident and firm on his stance as usual. But on sensitive issues he intelligently preferred to speak as less as possible to avoid any slips or gaffes that may create problems for him in the future.

Carbonated.TV