Thailand Is About Shut Down; Here’s Why

by
Sameera Ehteram
Thailand might declare a state of emergency soon and authorities have already deployed 15,000 police and troops to deal with the planned Bangkok shutdown by demonstrators trying to overthrow the current regime.

Thailand might declare a state of emergency soon and authorities have already deployed 15,000 police and troops to deal with the planned Bangkok shutdown by demonstrators trying to overthrow the current regime.

Sunny beaches, dream vacations and smiling people are what come to mind when one thinks of Thailand, not political tensions, angry masses and riot police.

What has caused this massive shift?

The angry protestors want to halt elections scheduled in February,  topple Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, and appoint a "people's council" to oversee reforms before any future vote.

They accuse Yingluck of being a puppet of her self-exiled brother and former premier, Thaksin Shinawatra.

Protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban, the former deputy premier from the opposition Democrat Party, announced more marches leading up to the January 13 "shutdown".

"We will keep walking, we won't stop," Suthep said. "We will walk until we win and we won't give up."

They haven’t.

Nitithorn Lamlua, coordinator for the Network of Students and People for Thailand's Reform is just as adamant to go ahead with the shutdown.

“We will do the shutdown continuously for at least seven days,” he says “Any violence will come from officials, not us,” he adds.

Apparently, it’s not just the masses led by the opposition who want change. A warrant has been issued for Mr Suthep’s arrest on charges of treason, but the police have so far ignored it.

Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra has asked for the support of the powerful military, but commanders have so far refused to take any action. Surely that indicates something.

Carbonated.TV