Putin Quits Russia’s Ruling Party; Forms All-Russia People’s Front

It is finally done, Vladimir Putin has finally broken his last link with the ruling party United Russia, a party that he himself formed over a decade ago. His position was taken over by Dmitry Medvedev. Putin plans to step down as the party Chairman after he returns to the Presidency on May 7, 2012.

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin during a meeting with the main Kremlin party United Russia in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, April 24, 2012. Putin announced Tuesday he would step down as the leader of the main Kremlin-controlled United Russia party after his inauguration on May 7. He said that the president should be a nonpartisan figure and suggested that Medvedev should succeed him as the party's head.

It is finally done, Vladimir Putin has finally broken his last link with the ruling party United Russia, a party that he himself formed over a decade ago. His position was taken over by Dmitry Medvedev. Putin plans to step down as the party Chairman after he returns to the Presidency on May 7, 2012.

This is an event of quite an importance as United Russia has been gathering a lot of negative sentiments from the people. Voters have become quite fed up with what they had dubbed as “the party of crooks and thieves” comprising of politicians who did not care beyond their bank accounts.  

Putin on the other hand remains a popular figure in Russian politics. Apparently Putin had gradually distanced himself from the party and consequently formed a new party called the All-Russia People’s Front.

Despite his autocratic ways, Putin has been good to Russia and is expected to bring some positive changes in Russia’s economic policy. It would be fair to mention here that Russia has not actually been doing that bad. Its GDP grew 4.3 percent each of the last two years and things are expected to maintain the positive course.

In recent years Russia has also seen a decline in inflation and unemployment. Keeping the global economic situation in mind, this is not bad. Add to it the fact that Russia will be entering the World Trade Organization this year and it sounds too good to be true for the Russian economy. Putin has made it his aim to target an entry in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, or OECD as well as promoting foreign direct investment.

A post United Russia Putin promises his countrymen a lot of changes including, an end to corruption, better facilities and infrastructure, betterment in education and health sectors. These are a lot of promises, but Russia has fared well under Putin and his people seem to believe in his ability to deliver what he promises.

Carbonated.TV