Quacks Claim Holy Water, Silver Will Cure Ebola

Lauren Burgoon
Disgraceful people claiming to cure Ebola are targeting African countries.

There's no cure for Ebola -- and that includes holy water.

A Nigerian preacher claiming that holy water cures the deadly virus just sent 4,000 bottles to Sierra Leone, Vocativ reports. And not just any holy water. It's patented by the preacher himself. 

T.B. Joshua is very popular in some African countries as a faith healer and televangelist. Which makes what he's doing with Ebola more criminal than eye-roll worthy.

Some Africans don't believe Ebola is real, claiming the disease is fictional and no one is suffering from it. Their denial comes as the deadliest Ebola outbreak ever is devastating western African countries. Up to 90 percent of people who contract Ebola will die from it.

Other charlatans are also targeting African countries with so-called Ebola cures. The makers of Nano Silver are pushing it on heads of African countries as a cure, the New York Times reports.

"All evidence suggests that Nano Silver will work where vaccines do not exist or fail and are effective even when the immune system is impaired, such as in AIDS," Nano Silver's medical director Rima Laibrow wrote.

Other alternative medicine proponents are making similar claims about their own products, prompting the FDA to issue a stern warning about fake Ebola cures.

Meanwhile, an Ebola clinic in Liberia came under attack this weekend from looters who stole mattresses and equipment, CNN reports. The attack sent Ebola patients fleeing, which is especially bad news to contain the spread, as patients need to be kept in isolation.