#RedMyLips Campaign Reminds The World Why It’s Not OK To Blame Rape Victims

This lipstick-based initiative aims to raise awareness about sexual assault and the culture of blaming the victim.

Rape is never the victim’s fault.

It doesn’t matter if someone was wearing a short dress or glossy red lipstick, was inebriated or high; no means no, which is the exact message “Red My Lips” campaign aims to promote.

This online initiative aims to raise awareness about survivors of sexual assault and address the issue of victim blaming – a horrid culture that keeps on pointing the finger at rape victims, implying they somehow encouraged the attack.

Since April is the official Sexual Assault Awareness Month, people have been showing their support for the cause by wearing red lipstick and sharing their selfies on social media with the hashtag #RedMyLips.

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Daniella Tansino started this nonprofit organization three years ago after going through a traumatic experience. She was raped in 2011, and was told by a female attorney that the court would not prosecute because “jurors don’t like girls that drink.” Not liking or accepting the answer, Tansino decided to take matter in her own hands and started a public awareness project to combat stereotypes about sexual assault.

“When people in my life show up wearing red lipstick, it says, ‘I see you. I hear you. What happened was not your fault. You’re not alone. And I’m not afraid to be seen and fight alongside you,’” she told Flare.

Each year, there are about 293,000 incidents of sexual assault in the U.S. alone and almost 68 percent of these cases not get reported. Out of the ones which go to the trial, 98 percent of the rapists don’t even spend a day in the jail, according to RAINN.

The inspirational campaign is not only limited to the U.S. anymore as people from all over the world are showing their support for the silent survivors.

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