Republican Party 2014 Strategy: Don’t Govern, Just Stay Angry About Obamacare

by
Owen Poindexter
The Republican Party had huge success in 2010 focusing on Obamacare. With the 2014 midterms just over a year away, Republicans are sowing the seeds for their nex push. Here’s their big pitch: The Republican Party still doesn’t like Obamacare.


republican party, obamacare, government shutdown, debt ceiling, eric cantor, john boehnerRepublican Party House Majority Leader Eric Cantor is confident that he can get angry right wingers to the polls with Obamacare again. PHOTO: Reuters

The Republican Party had huge success in 2010 focusing on Obama’s signature health care law, “the Affordable Care Act” or, more commonly “Obamacare." With the 2014 midterms just over a year away, Republicans are sowing the seeds for their attempt to take the Senate. Here’s their big pitch:

The Republican Party still doesn’t like Obamacare.

The Republican Party is painfully backward on this issue and the whole idea of governing, but they may be right about this in one way: midterm elections are all about turnout, and Obamacare can still rile up the GOP base and get them to the polls. In fact, Republicans see so little benefit in participating in government, that we are headed toward a government shutdown fueled mostly by Republican Party ire over Obamacare.

Read More: Republican Party Votes To Keep Being Dead Weight In The Political System

With two separate deadlines approaching for allowing the government to continue to fund itself (the “continuing resolution”) and raising the debt ceiling so that the government may actually pay for stuff that it has put on the credit card, Republicans have staked their ground: delay and defund Obamacare, or the government gets it.

Most Americans think this is a dumb idea: Obamacare is the law of the land, that is not going to change and the Republican Party needs to get over that fact. However, there is too much momentum behind the attack on Obamacare, that even though Republican Party leadership really does just want to pass the continuing resolution. The challenge for Democrats will be to get enough people to the polls that frustration with the GOP can actually effect the results. Otherwise, we’re looking at another election weighted heavily toward the angry far right.

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