Aung San Suu Kyi Should Be Stripped of Her Nobel Peace Prize for Failing to Stop This Tragedy

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Displaced Rohingya Muslims communicate with relatives who left the country inside bamboo "Internet huts."

Nearly 1.3 million Rohingya, a Muslim minority, live in Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

However, they are regarded as “outsiders” or migrants from Bangladesh. The situation for the community became worse in 2012 when the “969 Movement” was initiated by "Buddhist Bin Laden" Ashin Wirathu.

The genocidal campaign has caused hundreds of deaths and displaced more than 140,000 Muslims in almost three years.

Human Rights Watch reported in 2013 that tens of thousands of the displaced people have been denied access to humanitarian aid and are unable to return home.

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Reuters photographer Minzayar visited one of the camps for displaced Rohingya in February. There, he captured the heartbreaking stories of refugees communicating with their relatives inside bamboo “Internet huts.”

Here are some of the conversations recorded by Minzayar:

Rohingya Muslims In Myanmar

Rohimar, a 30-year-old Rohingya, reacts as she talks to her brother Abdul Rahman, 25, who left Myanmar eight months ago and is currently in Malaysia, from an Internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar January 31, 2015. Rohimar is upset.

She says she sold everything to fund her brother's journey overseas, but he hasn't sent her any money. "I feel alone and abandoned," she says. "He only gives money to his wife who is still living here. We are left totally helpless even though I always pray for him."

Also Read: Rohingya Muslims’ Voting Rights Are Revoked. Where Is Aung San Suu Kyi?

Muslims In Myanmar

Muhammad Eliyas, a 23-year-old Rohingya, speaks to his 17-year-old brother who is in the hands of traffickers, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar January 31, 2015.

He and their mother have brought the equivalent of $1,500 to the internet hut, whose owner will transfer it to the trafficker via a middleman in a nearby village. Relatives entrust Kyaw Thein with bricks of kyat which he delivers to a Rohingya middleman in a nearby village. He says he doesn't charge for this service or deal directly with the traffickers. "They trust me," he says, "but I don't trust them."

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Rohingya Muslims photos

Norbanu, a 60-year-old Rohingya, speaks with her daughter's boyfriend, who is now in Indonesia, from an Internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar, on Feb. 14, 2015. He has broken his promise to send for her, Norbanu tells him, so she will now marry off her daughter to another man.

Rohingya Muslims In Burma

Ma Saw Khin talks to her sister and brother-in-law in Malaysia from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar, on Feb. 15, 2015. Ma Saw Khin, 35, is a Kaman Muslim from the Rakhine town of Kyaukphyu, where Buddhists drove out the Muslim population in 2012. She jokes with her sister and brother-in-law in Malaysia, but the call has a serious purpose: they promise to send Ma Saw Khin money to buy food and medicine for their sick mother.

Read More: Since When Did Buddhism Start Associating Itself With Terror?

burma muslims

Abdul Salam, a 47-year-old Rohingya, asks a friend in Malaysia for advice from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar, on January 29, 2015. His friend Muhammad Rafiq, a Rohingya in Thae Chaung village, has a son held by traffickers, and they are raising the money to pay the ransom. Abdul Salam's question is: How can he be sure the trafficker, once paid, will let the boy go?

Burma anti-Muslim riots

Noor Zirarmad, 67, speaks to his son in Malaysia from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 15, 2015. The son of Noor Zirarmad has sent him the equivalent of about $100. Zirarmad, a Rohingya Muslim, is confirming receipt of the money, which will pay for medical treatment for his sick wife.

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