Rising Sea Levels May Flood Dozens Of US Cities: Study

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“This research hones in on exactly how sea level rise is hitting us first. The number of people experiencing chronic floods will grow much more quickly than sea level itself.”

Climate change is not a “hoax.” it’s actually happening and a new study reveals a list of cities in the United States that could very well disappear because of higher sea levels from climate change.

According to the study, in the next 15 to 20 years, almost 200 places may not be livable in the United States.

A number of cities not expected to make it through the next 20, 50 or 80 years were listed in the study. The list includes huge metropolises like New York, Boston, San Francisco and Miami.

The report predicts the cities will be underwater as they will experience floods at least 26 times per year.

Vulnerable areas include North Carolina; Louisiana; Galveston, Texas; Sanibel Island, Florida; Hilton Head, South Carolina; Ocean City, Maryland; and many cities along the Jersey Shore.

“This research hones in on exactly how sea level rise is hitting us first. The number of people experiencing chronic floods will grow much more quickly than sea level itself," Benjamin Strauss, vice president for Sea Level and Climate Impacts at Climate Central, said in reaction to this study.

He added, “This study highlights something it's really important for people to understand. Sea level rise means sharp growth in coastal flooding. In fact, most coastal floods today are already driven by human-caused sea level rise.”

A population of more than 100,000 could be affected by the rising sea levels and the impact could stretch to around 50 cities. By the end of the century, residents of nearly 500 cities will be left with the choice of either to migrate or to abandon their homes.

Although the West Coast is spared at the moment, it is likely San Francisco and Los Angeles will be on the list by 2100. 

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