Row To Riot: Restaurant Bill Cost 4 People Their Lives & Injures 175+ In India

by
editors
No matter how ‘democratic’ a country as a whole claims or appears to be if it has a history of minority-related conflicts, it will never be ‘truly’ democratic. We often find related examples in Pakistan and India both of which have a well-known history of religious conflict.

Row To Riot

Reuters

No matter how ‘democratic’ a country as a whole claims or appears to be if it has a history of minority-related conflicts, it will never be ‘truly’ democratic. We often find related examples in Pakistan and India both of which have a well-known history of religious conflict.

Just yesterday, a riot broke out in Dhule, in the Indian state of Maharashtra, between the Hindu community and the Indian Muslim community, leaving four dead and almost 175 people injured. The restaurant owner belonged to one community and the customer to another.

Both men had a row over an unpaid bill and the customer brought fifty people from his community and assaulted the owner as a reaction of which a fight between two people escalated into a full fledged riot between two different ‘religious’ groups.

This is a glimpse of what life used to be during the time of partition of United India. In October 2008, similar events occurred in Dhule between Hindus and Muslims.

India is a democratic republic. But it is a ‘sensitive’ democracy. It has many records of Hindu-Muslim riots (especially in Gujarat) both during and after partition. It may be on its path to become a developed nation but it constantly faces an inner threat of violence from among its (diverse) population.

The Indian Muslims blame the Hindus for this incident and they blame Muslims. For now, according to a police official, the area where the riot broke out, the situation is under a curfew and under control.

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