Beating Women And Children Is Legal In Russia, Thanks To Putin

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"I don't think that we should violate the rights of family and sometimes a man and a woman, wife and husband, have a conflict," said a supporter of the law.

Russian President Vladimir Putin recently accepted a law partially legalizing domestic violence.

From now on, causing physical injuries to a spouse and children will result in a fine of up to 30,000 rubles ($507), 15 days in prison or 120 hours of community service.

However, the law has one condition — the court will only implement it if the beatings occur more than once a year. 

The law reduces domestic violence to a civil one instead of a criminal one in first instances. It also puts an end to violence that does not cause bodily harm.

The rule is only applicable when a person gets injured severely.

Unsurprisingly, the Russian conservatives welcomed the move.

Conservative Senator Yelena Mizulina, one of the bill’s sponsors who previously made headlines for a law that banned “gay propaganda,” believes the law will keep the state from interfering with “family matters.”

“The question is not whether it’s OK to hit or not. Of course it isn’t," said one of the MPs who wrote the law, Olga Batalina. "The question is how to punish people and what you should punish them for."

“I don't think that we should violate the rights of family and sometimes a man and a woman, wife and husband, have a conflict," said another supporter of the law. "Sometimes in this conflict they use, I don't know, a frying pan, uncooked spaghetti, and so on. Frankly speaking what we call home violence is not home violence — it's sort of a new picture of family relations created by liberal media."

Meanwhile, women's rights campaigners do not buy this theory. In fact, they vocally oppose the law partially decriminalizing domestic violence.

According to Russia’s interior ministry, almost 38,000 people, approximately three quarters of them women, suffered assault by a family member in 2013.

"It is a very dangerous for the government to draw a line between 'just bruises' or serious physical violence because... the situation in Russia shows, that domestic violence very rarely ends with bruises. It usually almost always goes to the next step," said Yulia Gorbunova of Human Rights Watch.

Truth be told, this law does nothing but make life easier for those who believe beating women and children increases their masculinity.

Banner/Spotlight Credits: Reuters 

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