Russian TV "Accidentally" Broadcasts Top Secret Nuclear Torpedo Plans

Two Kremlin-controlled TV stations inadvertently showed the secret plans for a nuclear torpedo system while filming a national security meeting.

Nuclear Torpedo Plans

Russia’s top-secret nuclear plans are now public knowledge, thanks to the local TV news stations that forgot to blur out an important document and accidentally leaked Kremlin’s momentous plan to bypass Nato's missile shield using nuclear torpedoes.

As awfully impossible as it sounds, NTV and Channel One broadcasted a clip of a military official reading a confidential looking document with drawings and details of Status-6, a weapon system reportedly designed by a nuclear submarine construction company based in St. Petersburg.

Apparently, the Kremlin-controlled TV stations captured this crucial shot while filming a meeting between President Vladimir Putin and military officials, where Putin had warned that “Russia will take necessary retaliatory measures to strengthen the potential of our strategic nuclear forces.”

The footage was deleted shortly after it aired, but the damage had already been done. By then, several websites had jumped into action and immortalized the error with simple screenshots.

“The nuclear torpedoes, to be fired by submarines, would create zones of extensive radioactive contamination making them unsuitable for military or economic activity for a long period,” read the document that was visible on-air for several seconds.

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What’s most interesting about this whole episode is that while all other documents in the footage were blurred out, this classified piece of paper remained the only thing that went completely unnoticed – especially since Russian channels are tightly monitored.

“It’s true some secret data got into the shot, therefore it was subsequently deleted,” said president’s spokesperson Dmitry Peskov, confirming the leak. “In future we will undoubtedly take preventive measures so this does not happen again.”

Perhaps in future, they should avoid allowing cameras in their national security meetings altogether.