Saudi Women Driving May Harm Their Ovaries And Future Generations!

by
Sameera Ehteram
A cleric in Saudi Arabia has said that if women manage to win their struggle to get behind the steering wheel of a car, the actual exercise of driving one could damage their ovaries and cause them to bear children with clinical complications.

Driving Harms Women's What

A cleric in Saudi Arabia has said that if women manage to win their struggle to get behind the steering wheel of a car, the actual exercise of driving one could damage their ovaries and cause them to bear children with clinical complications.

Sheikh Saleh bin Saad al-Lohaidanurged women aiming to overturn the ban on driving  to put"reason ahead of their hearts, emotions and passions".

Well, to be exact, he said, "If a woman drives a car, not out of pure necessity, that could have negative physiological impacts as functional and physiological medical studies show that it automatically affects the ovaries and pushes the pelvis upwards."

Yes, he actually thought of that, and, said it with a straight face.

In a country where women risk getting lashed for driving and morality is threatened by beautiful eyes, it is hardly surprising that some men are coming up with ridiculous theories. It shows the desperation of Arab men to control women.

Driving Harms Women's What

Facebook The internet is responding as expected with outrage to the latest statement from the Saudi religious police.

Worth noting is the fact that this declaration has come just a week before October 26, a day set by Saudi women to defy the ban on driving. They plan to drive on the day to press the authorities to lift the ban. A fresh petition was also filed.

This is not the first time. The struggle of Saudi women for such a basic right has been a long and arduous one. The opposition they have had to face ranges from mindboggling to downright ridiculous.

Driving Harms Women's What

In 1990, during the Gulf War, 47 women staged a public protest by driving around the capital city of Riyadh in a convoy until they were stopped by the police. They and their families had to pay dearly for their show of courage.

In 2007, a petition signed by 1,100 people, and submitted to King Abdullah, asking for women to be allowed to drive, produced no results.

The following year, activist Wajeha al-Huwaider, protested against the ban by filming herself while driving on a highway.

In 2011, a group of women activists started social media campaigns like ‘Women2Drive, Saudi Women to Drive and Honk For Saudi Women

 One of the most prominent activists in this regard, Manal al-Sharif, followed Wajeha al-Huwaider’s example and posted an online video of herself while driving on a main road.

You may also like to read: Saudi Arabia To Allow Women To Ride Bikes But With Five Restrictions

So far, there hasn’t been much progress. The best the Saudi government can do is offer their women afemale only city, which really defies the purpose.

However, these women are relentless. What’s more, their efforts are getting international support and encouragement. Every passing day brings more restrictions and opposition, but they seem to be getting closer to their goal. The participation of the first Saudi female athletes in the London Olympics has given them some hope.

So, here’s looking forward to October 26, and hoping to see some progress. If ovaries need to be sacrificed in the process, so be it!

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