School District Launches HR Investigation Into Controversial Math Problems

Gwinnett County Schools says it has launched a full 'human resources investigation' into all teachers involved with some controversial math homework questions that talked about slavery and beatings.

School district launches HR investigationGWINNETT COUNTY, Ga. —Gwinnett County Schools says it has launched a full 'human resources investigation' into all teachers involved with some controversial math homework questions that talked about slavery and beatings.

Since Channel 2's Kerry Kavanaugh first reported the story on Friday, it has gained a lot of national attention, including from the NAACP of Georgia, who is calling for the teacher who wrote the questions to be fired.

School district launches HR investigationKavanaugh learned Monday that while one teacher wrote all the questions on the homework assignment, all nine third-grade teachers saw them before they were handed out to students.

Officials with the district told Kavanaugh four of the nine teachers handed out the assignment, but it is unclear how many students received the assignment.

"I think I'm still in shock," parent Nicole Thompson said.

She said she still has a lot of questions about her 8-year-old son's math homework.

School district launches HR investigation into controversial math problems One word problem asked how many oranges would each slave pick. In another, Frederick was picking cotton.

Students were even asked to calculate how many beatings Frederick would get in a week.

"Who would think of such questions to ask third-grade children?" Thompson asked.

Friday, the Gwinnett County School District said the teacher was trying to reinforce social studies lessons through math but agreed the questions were inappropriate.

"I definitely want an apology. I want them to acknowledge that not only was this bad judgment on their behalf, but we need to do better," Thompson said.

The parents said they are also concerned that while their child brought it home as homework, other students did the assignment in the classroom. They said they want a notice going home notifying all parents about what happened.

"The principal also is handling concerns of parents as he meets and talks to parents," district spokeswoman Sloan Roach said.