Scott Walker Wants Colleges to Stop Reporting on Sexual Assault

Jessica Renae Buxbaum
The Wisconsin governor's proposed budget deletes reporting requirements for sexual assault on university campuses.

Scott Walker

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) proposed budget deletes language requiring universities to report on sexual assault to the Department of Justice, Jezebel reported.

The budget removes requirements to provide sexual assault statistics to newly entering students and to supply all students enrolled in the given institution the same information. Walker’s plan also deletes the requirement that university employees who witness a sexual assault have to report on it.  

Here is the text to delete these requirements:



Delete the requirement that the Board direct each institution and college campus to incorporate oral and written or electronic information on sexual assault in its orientation program for newly entering students and to supply all students enrolled in the institution or college campus with the same information in either printed or electronic form.


Delete the requirement that the Board of Regents submit an annual report to the Legislature regarding the methods used to comply with the above requirement.


Delete the requirement that any person employed at an institution who witnesses a sexual assault on campus or receives a report from a student enrolled in the institution that the student has been sexually assaulted report the assault to the dean of students. Delete the requirement that each institution report annually to the Department of Justice (DOJ) statistics on sexual assaults and on sexual assaults committed by acquaintances of the victims that occurred on the campus of that institution in the previous years, and that DOJ include those statistics in appropriate crime reports.

Campus sexual assault is a growing concern across American universities that already face lax regulations, significant underreporting and administrations that are clearly refusing to take stronger efforts to diminish its prevalence within their institutions. With so many obstacles already in place, Walker’s plan sounds the alarm for survivors and advocates struggling to make academic institutions a safe space for all students.