Scottish Helicopter Crash Site Searched For Bodies

by
Reuters
Emergency workers in Scotland pulled a body on Sunday from the wreckage of a pub into which a police helicopter crashed during a concert, and were searching for more victims, police said.

* Eight confirmed killed after helicopter crash in Glasgow

* Scottish police search wreckage of pub for bodies

* 12 people still in hospital; investigation under way

Emergency workers in Scotland pulled a body on Sunday from the wreckage of a pub into which a police helicopter crashed during a concert, and were searching for more victims, police said.

Deputy Chief Constable Rose Fitzpatrick, of Police Scotland, said in Glasgow that the final toll would not be certain until the wreckage of the helicopter is removed from the pub.

"Earlier this morning, the body of another person was removed from the incident site," she told reporters. "Work also continues to recover further bodies from the site. Until we remove the helicopter, we cannot be sure what we will find."

Twelve people remain in hospital, while eight have been confirmed dead after Friday's accident, and workers are still trying to remove the smashed helicopter from the Clutha pub and music venue in the city centre, Fitzpatrick said.

"This is a painstaking process which we expect to take some time because we need to ensure the safety of the operation," she said.

On Saturday, police said the helicopter's crew - two police officers and a civilian pilot - were among the dead.

Witnesses said the helicopter "dropped like a stone", crashing into the pub's roof and causing part of it to collapse onto those inside. One described the scene as "total bedlam", with people struggling to breathe in the dust-filled venue.

One survivor, Craig Bain, visited the scene on Sunday to pay his respects to the dead. Others laid flowers near the pub.

"I just remember waking up and being pulled out by a fireman," a tearful Bain, his head bandaged, told STV News. "There was a man on the news whose dad was right next to me. He was one of the dead."

Investigators are still examining the cause of the crash. The 12-metre (40-foot) helicopter was a twin-engine Eurocopter EC135 T2, made by a subsidiary of EADS.

"Everybody wants to know what went so catastrophically wrong," said Scotland's Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon. "It is too early to speculate. We all want to know the answers and I am sure that picture will become clearer in the days, weeks and months to come."

She paid tribute to the emergency workers and bystanders who helped injured people out of the wreckage.

Sturgeon earlier attended a service at Glasgow Cathedral where eight candles were lit for the victims.