Should Sharia Be The Law Of A Muslim State? According To Pew Study Most Of The Muslims Believe So!

by
Sameera Ehteram
According to a Pew research, most of the Muslims around the world tend to be deeply committed to their faith and believe that it should shape not only their personal lives, but the societies they live in as well. Not only that, many of the 38,000 Muslims in 39 countries from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East, included in the Pew survey believed that opting to leave Islam should be punishable by death penalty.

Sharia

According to a Pew research, most of the Muslims around the world tend to be deeply committed to their faith and believe that it should shape not only their personal lives, but the societies they live in as well. Not only that, many of the 38,000 Muslims in 39 countries from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East, included in the Pew survey believed that opting to leave Islam should be punishable by death penalty.

death penalty graph

It also shows that, "Many also think that their religious leaders should have at least some influence over political matters. And many express a desire for sharia — traditional Islamic law — to be recognized as the official law of their country."

“Most Muslims believe Shariah [Islamic law based on the teachings of the Koran] is the revealed word of God rather than a body of law developed by men based on the word of God,” the report says.

female hijab

However, quite notably, major Islamic countries like Saudi Arabia, Iran and Sudan are not mentioned in the study. These three are definitely one of the highest countries in the Muslim world that are submissive to sharia.

Sharia  is the moral code and religious law of Islam. It does give an entire conduct of life including social dealings, human rights and politics.

Reuters, rightly puts it saying, “Unlike codified Western law, sharia is a loosely defined set of moral and legal guidelines based on the Koran, the sayings of Prophet Mohammad (hadith) and Muslim traditions. Its rules and advice cover everything from prayers to personal hygiene.

However the main issue is its interpretation by various factions of the religion which vary from moderation and freedom to extreme conservatism. So

Amaney Jamal, a Princeton University political scientist and a special adviser for the project, said Muslims in poor and repressive societies tended to identify sharia with basic Islamic values such as equality and social justice.

"In those societies, you tend to see significant support for sharia," she told journalists on a conference call. By contrast, Muslims who have lived under "narrow if not rigid" Islamic systems were less supportive of sharia as the official law.

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