Gay Penguins Too Controversial For Singapore

Lauren Burgoon
Books about adoption and same-sex parents are yanked from Singapore libraries.

Singapore is having itself a good old-fashioned book burning, not just banning but destroying three books that don't depict traditional families.

The country's National Library Board, a governmental agency, yanked three children's books from the shelves that all depict families without a mom and dad.

"NLB’s collection development policy takes special care of our children’s collections to ensure they are age-appropriate. We take a cautious approach, particularly in books and materials for children," officials said in a statement. 

Yes, heaven knows children must be protected from the evil that is adoption, same-sex parents and (gasp!) homosexual penguins. 

The books are "The White Swan Express: A Story About Adoption," "Who's In My Family: All About Our Families," and "And Tango Makes Three."

NLB officials tried to defend their move, saying, "Our Adult collection does contain titles with homosexual themes and our collection policy does not exclude materials on alternative lifestyles."

Singapore won't just ban the books from libraries; officials plan to destroy them rather than give the books away.

Banning books is unfortunately all-too common, but it's usually a hand-wringing parent or misguided school board making the call, not a national governmental agency.

Then again, Singapore has never been a soft place to land for gays. Gay male sex is illegal there (lesbians are free to get it on), same-sex couples have no right to marry or adopt and there are few anti-discrimination laws.

The #FreeMyBooks campaign started on Twitter, with a special shout out to Tango and his two gay penguin dads.