Sir Fred Goodwin Superinjunction Raised In Raised

Sir Fred Goodwin, the controversial former chief executive of the Royal Bank of Scotland, obtained a superinjunction to prevent details of his alleged extra-marital affair with a senior colleague being made public, it was claimed in the House of Lords on Thursday.

Sir Fred Goodwin, the controversial former chief executive of the Royal Bank of Scotland, obtained a superinjunction to prevent details of his alleged extra-marital affair with a senior colleague being made public, it was claimed in the House of Lords on Thursday.

The wide-ranging gagging order – which prevented Goodwin from being identified as a banker – was brought up by Lord Stoneham, a Liberal Democrat peer, during a debate in the Lords. Stoneham's comments are protected by parliamentary privilege.

Goodwin's superinjunction was first made public during a House of Commons debate in March. However, there have been no claims about the subject matter of the injunction until now.

Stoneham, speaking on behalf of fellow Liberal Democrat peer Lord Oakeshott, said during the debate: "Would [the speaker] accept that every taxpayer has a direct public interest in the events leading up to the collapse of the Royal Bank of Scotland?

"So how can it be right for a superinjunction to hide the alleged relationship between Sir Fred Goodwin and a senior colleague? If true it would be a serious breach of corporate governance and not even the Financial Services Authority would know about it."

The Gardian