Stephen Lawrence Murder: Get The Other Killers, Judge Tells Police

Scotland Yard must hunt down and prosecute the killers of Stephen Lawrence who are still at large, a judge said. Mr Justice Treacy made his plea as he jailed for murder two members of a racist gang. He sentenced Gary Dobson to at least 15 years and 2 months and David Norris to at least 14 years and 3 months. Police said they did not have enough evidence to prosecute other suspects. Bernard Hogan-Howe, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner, said his force would pursue Stephen’s other killers. He said they "should not rest easily in their beds".

Stephen Lawrence Murder: Get The Other Killers, Judge Tells Police

• David Norris jailed for 14 years and three months
• Gary Dobson jailed for 15 years and two months
• Other suspects warned "not to rest easily in their beds"
• Neville Lawrence hopes killers will now give up others
• Doreen Lawrence says she can now start new life
• Jack Straw says Britain still has long way to go in race relations

Mr Justice Treacy made his plea as he jailed for murder two members of a racist gang. He sentenced Gary Dobson to at least 15 years and 2 months and David Norris to at least 14 years and 3 months.

Police said they did not have enough evidence to prosecute other suspects.

Bernard Hogan-Howe, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner, said his force would pursue Stephen’s other killers. He said they "should not rest easily in their beds".

Bernard Hogan-Howe, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner

Detectives on the case will meet next week to build a prosecution against other suspects in the black teenager’s murder.

A spokesman for the Met said last night that officers had received several phone calls within the past 24 hours with new information that would be followed up by the force. The officer in charge of the case, Det Chief Insp Clive Driscoll told the BBC that police would be visiting Dobson and Norris in prison to see whether they would be willing to assist the inquiry.

He said he remained “optimistic” about further progress being made. in the case.
Stephen Lawrence Murder: Get The Other Killers, Judge Tells Police
Mr Justice Treacy, who presided over the seven-week trial, said he accepted that Dobson’s and Norris’s sentences would be seen as low.

He said he was constrained by law and had to treat the pair as juveniles because they were younger than 18 at the time of the murder.

After passing his sentence, the judge called Mr Driscoll forward.

He told the detective that the Metropolitan Police had been “shamed and humbled” after an official inquiry into its handling of the case found the force was “institutionally racist”.

He said: “A measure of justice has been achieved at last.

“However, the convictions of Gary Dobson and David Norris will not, I hope, close the file on this murder.

“On the evidence before the court there are still three or four other killers of Stephen Lawrence at large. Just as advances in science have brought two people to justice, I hope the Metropolitan Police will be alert to future lines of inquiry.”

It is understood that the 23 officers from Operation Fishpool, the murder investigation team, will meet next week. They will discuss whether anything heard during the trial has presented any opportunities to prosecute Neil Acourt, Jamie Acourt or Luke Knight, the remaining suspects.

But Dobson’s mother Pauline said her son “doesn’t know who did it”. His family said he planned to appeal against the conviction.

Officers are likely to try to use new forensic analysis techniques to try to secure further convictions. They also hope that the “changing allegiances” of people who know the gang will result in new witnesses coming forward.

In the cases of Neil Acourt and Luke Knight, the evidence must be “new, compelling, reliable and substantial”.

The two men, with Dobson, were acquitted of the murder at a private prosecution in 1996 and a judge would need to rule on the evidence before their acquittals could be quashed.

The Stephen Lawrence murder sparked a “sea change” in attitudes, Jack Straw, the former home secretary, said. But he said Britain still had further to go to tackle racism.