Sudan Steps Up Crackdown On Protests

Opposition politicians in Sudan say authorities have used tear gas to break up a protest of several hundred students in the capital Khartoum, as the government described a wave of demonstrations now in their second week as "sabotage."

The damaged Qurtoba conference hall is seen after demonstrations by Sudanese university students and citizens yesterday in the capital Khartoum, Sudan, Sunday, June 24, 2012. Protests were set off by economic austerity measures but marchers are also demanding the ouster of longtime Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. Sudanese opposition figures say protests have entered their eighth day, as the government vowed to crack down on demonstrators.

Opposition politicians in Sudan say authorities have used tear gas to break up a protest of several hundred students in the capital Khartoum, as the government described a wave of demonstrations now in their second week as "sabotage."

Kamal Omar of the Popular Congress Party says several hundred students were attacked by government-allied militias at a gathering on Sunday at Khartoum University, where the unrest began eight days ago. Other opposition figures say police fired tear gas to break up the rally and arrested dozens of students.

The official SUNA news agency reported late Saturday that Khartoum authorities instructed police to "deal sternly with saboteurs."

Protests were set off by economic austerity measures but marchers are also demanding the ouster of longtime President Omar al-Bashir.