What About The Internally Displaced People Of Syria?

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editors
The international debate surrounding Syrian refugees overshadows Syrians still stuck in the country as internally displaced persons and in grave danger.

syrian refugees

Over the past year, refugees fleeing the Middle East and their resettlement in the West have remained the focus of international concern. Over 4 million people have left Syria ever since the deadly civil war broke out in March 2011.

But not much attention has been paid to the millions of people who are trapped and displaced inside the embattled country.

The ordeal of internally displaced persons, aka IDPs, in Syria mostly goes unreported in the mainstream media due to the absence of journalists in war-stricken regions. Meanwhile, the majority of anaylsis on Syria is dominated by the sectarian conflict or on the blame game played between world powers about the destruction of the country.

And while refugees may escape the clutches of terrorism in Syria, the IDPs are left at the mercy of the terrorists or the forces loyal to Bashar al Assad.

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"IDPs in a lot of ways are more vulnerable than refugees, or vulnerable in different ways," Stephanie Kim Gee, a fellow at Human Rights Watch's refugee rights program, told The WorldPost.

Syria, Syria war

Not many people know this but Syria, as of September 2015, has more IDPs than any other country in the world.

As of June 30, the conflict in Syria killed nearly 11,100 people this year, according to USAID figures, with most of the deaths caused by attacks carried out by the Syrian Arab Republic Government (SARG) and pro-SARG forces — nearly 7,000 civilians. Apart from the loss of life, more than 11 million people have been displaced, including 7.6 million internally and more than 3.9 million to neighboring countries.

"I think we use up a lot of energy talking about solving the refugee crisis, but far less focus on finding a solution to the conflict itself," Carsten Hansen, Middle East director for the Norwegian Refugee Council told the BBC. "We need to find a way of stopping the fighting."

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