14-Year-Old Girl Arrested For 'Joking' She's A Terrorist On Twitter

Sameera Ehteram
Teenagers do a lot of idiotic things, but this one surely takes the cake.

UPDATE: The 14-year-old Dutch girl who pretended she was a member of Al Qaida and tweeted to American Airlines that she was going to do "something really big" was arrested in Rotterdam on Monday, according to the Associated Press.

The tweet (above) went viral over the weekend and most Internet comments were less than sympathetic, especially American Airlines, after the girl apologized for the tweet.

What followed was a classic meltdown:

Then the teenager got her 15 minutes of fame for all the wrong reasons. People started began sharing her tweet and the airline’s response and within no time. The Twitterverse was buzzing and Sarah got the kind of celebrity status she could never have dreamed of.

It wasn’t what she was expecting and it wasn’t welcome.

In her attempts to further clarify, Sarah posted a message to the Photos and Videos section of her Twitter account saying:

“Okay so the truth is, I wrote that tweet like a month ago, but I didn’t sent it because I knew it wasn’t a good idea. I saved it in my drafts and did nothing with it. So today I was at home and my twitter tripped, and my phone sent the tweet accidentally and I didn’t see it. Within a few minutes, I saw the tweet American Air sent me, and I got scared and didn’t know what to do. I got a lot of reactions from people, but I didn’t know it was that bad, to be honest. I gained more than 15K followers and got a lot of RTs (my tweet got almost 20K RTs). After I realized, it was a bad and stupid idea, so I deleted it, but now it’s everywhere. But let’s make three things clear. 1) It wasn’t about 9/11, 2) It wasn’t about the missing plane, 3) It was an accident.”

But the damage had been done. American Airlines didn’t address her or the tweet any further. They even deleted the original one and simply issued a statement:

“At American, the safety of our passengers and crew is our number one priority,”American said in a statement.“We take security matters very seriously and work with authorities on a case by case basis.”

But the storm had already picked up force and the teenager was bombarded with so much attention (most of it negative) online that it became overwhelming for her. 

She vacillated between hysteria and meltdown but she can’t be blamed.

Of course she’s been getting a lot of flak online from people. Most of them are rather unforgiving:

We say let her go; she did something stupid and has paid for it enough.