Texas A&M Shooting: Family Says Shooter Thomas Caffall Was A ‘Ticking Time Bomb’

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staff
The crazed gut nut who killed a county constable and another person and wounded two others in a shooting near Texas A&M University on Monday was a "ticking time bomb" that was ready to blow, his family said.

Thomas "Tres" Caffall allegedly shot four people near Texas A&M on Monday. Two of the victims, a local constable and an innocent bystander, died from their wounds.

The crazed gut nut who killed a county constable and another person and wounded two others in a shooting near Texas A&M University on Monday was a "ticking time bomb" that was ready to blow, his family said.

"He was crazy as hell," Richard Weaver, gunman Thomas Caffall's stepfather, told Houston station KPRC television.

"At one point, we were afraid that he was going to come up here and do something to his mother and me," Weaver said.

 Shawn Kemp, a local acquaintance of Caffall’s, told The Eagle newspaper that he “fits the profile of a dude who might snap.”

Caffall seemed depressed and often talked about guns and war, Kemp told the newspaper.

"I don’t know the guy well, but I’ve been around him enough to know, well, that I’m not surprised at all,” Kemp said, adding that he had heard that Caffall planned to pawn some of his guns to pay his rent.

Caffall, 35, died after being shot by SWAT officers during a 30-minute firefight in College Station, Texas, at around 12:45 p.m.

The shootout started shortly after noon when Caffall shot and killed Brian Bachmann, 41, a Brazos County constable and married father of two, while Bachmann was trying to serve him with a notice to evict his one-story, two bedroom home.

 Police responded to the scene and found Bachmann lying wounded in the front yard, and Caffall opened fire on them from inside his house.

Witnesses described hearing a barrage of at least 30 shots from a semiautomatic weapon, as cops dove for cover behind their vehicles and yelled at neighbors to stay inside their homes.

Rigo Cisneros, a neighbor and former Army medic, recorded some of the gunfight while taking cover beneath some bushes his yard, The Eagle reported.

After the shooting stopped, Cisneros told police he was a medic and was given the go-ahead to try to help the mortally wounded officer.

“I performed CPR. There were no vital signs on the constable when I got there,” Cisneros told The Eagle. “He took one clear gunshot wound to the chest.”

Cisneros also said he tried to help Caffall, who he said was shot "several times."

“(He) looked up at me and asked me to apologize to the officer that was shot,” the 40-year-old medic said.

Cisneros said Caffall was conscious when paramedics took him away, The Eagle reported.