The Egyptians, Salafists, Army Or God: Who Can Save Egypt?

by
Fatimah Mazhar
Egypt is going through turmoil. It all began when millions of Egyptians flooded into the streets on the first anniversary of “Islamist” President Mohamed Morsi's inauguration on Sunday demanding his resignation marking the largest demonstrations since 2011 and probably the biggest protests in the country’s history!

Who Can Save Egypt?

Reuters

Egypt is going through turmoil. It all began when millions of Egyptians flooded into the streets on the first anniversary of “Islamist” President Mohamed Morsi's inauguration on Sunday demanding his resignation marking the largest demonstrations since 2011 and probably the biggest protests in the country’s history!

Read More: Top 5 Factors Behind Anti - Mohamed Morsi “Mass” Protests In Egypt

After his ouster, the supporters of Mohamed Morsi continue their sit-ins as the fate of Egypt as a whole remains undecided. Many are commenting, analyzing and predicting what could possibly be the future of the country which has been failed by almost every other ruler and his ouster.

The same question is being asked over and over again and that is; who can save Egypt? Who can save the country from psychological, economic and political deterioration? There are, but three possible options; the Egyptians (the anti-Morsi people), the Salafists (al-Nour Islamists), and the Army.

Different analysts, bloggers, columnists and journalists have given different opinions. Let’s take a look at some of them and see if we can deduce something out of it.

Can The Salafists Save Egypt?

David Kenner, associate editor at Foreign Policy magazine, wrote an article of the same title mentioned above. He discussed the role of Salafists to bring about a change in Egypt’s current situation.

Al-Nour Salafist Party is an ultra-conservative Islamist political organization which was up until nine months ago,  a key ally of Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood. But later it detached itself from the association since it was collapsing increasingly. Now al-Nour Salafists are apparently the most unexpected player in the secular-leaning coalition guiding Egypt through its latest transition.

But given their Brotherhood past, is it possible for Egyptians to trust the Salafists with power? After all, the status of al-Nour is the same as MB’s post-Mubarak ouster.

WATCH: Egyptian Photojournalist Captures His Own Death On Camera (VIDEO)

Can The Egyptians Save Egypt?

A blog written in the Huffington Post pondered over the Egyptians role in saving their country. The writer suggested, “Instead of Egyptians remaining on the streets and demonstrating, they must now save Egypt by leaving the streets and engaging in the democratic process.”

He said that President Mansour must use his authority to conduct elections that truly represent the will of the people.

But then again, wasn’t this ecactly what the Egyptian people did a year ago when they ‘democratically’ elected Morsi as their president?

Surely Mansour could turn out to be different but that’s what people thought about Morsi as well.

Who Can Save Egypt?

Reuters

Can The Army Save Egypt?

This question has been asked by several analysts every now and then. But the Egyptian army has committed several mistakes in the past month that no one really bothers to ask this question anymore or consider this as a viable option anymore. The massacre of pro-Morsi activists, regardless of what provoked them, was something that has made the army coup unreliable and untrustworthy for a majority of Egyptians (and people of the world in general).

Read: The Incredible Hypocrisy Of Egypt's Military

Shooting opposition activists never actually helped run a country.

Can God Save Egypt?

Yes, matters have become so much worse in Egypt to an extent that people are actually turning towards supernatural powers for help. Or at least considering them. Pulitzer Prize winner Thomas L. Friedman asked this question in his op-ed for The New York Times and concluded it by saying, “God is not going to save Egypt. It will be saved only if the opposition here respects that the Muslim Brotherhood won the election fairly — and resists its excesses not with boycotts (or dreams of a coup) but with better ideas that win the public to the opposition’s side.”

Which brings us back to Mohamed Morsi and his elections.

This is going nowhere. The question remains. There is no definite answer. The fight continues and so does the question.

 Who can save Egypt? Anyone?

Do you have an analysis to share? Feel free to post it in the comments section below.

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