The Magic Hangover Killer Pill May Be Coming

by
Owen Poindexter
Scientists at UCLA have made a breakthrough in something many of their students could use: a pill to do away with hangovers.

A major scientific breakthrough for partiers everywhere: researchers at UCLA claim to have found the cure for the common hangover. A peer-reviewed paper in the journal Nature Nanotechnology by Yunfeng Lu and his colleagues describes placing two complimentary enzymes in a pill to facilitate the elimination of alcohol from the body.

"The pill acts in a way extremely similar to the way our liver does," Yu explained. "With further research, this discovery could be used as a preventative measure or antidote for alcohol intoxication."

Yu seems to have the opposite idea from some people about what this line of research could lead to. He is thinking in terms of preventing drunkenness. The rest of you are undoubtedly thinking of preventing the negative effects of drunkenness, meaning you could drink more freely.

Researchers found that drunk mice sobered up more quickly, or at least their alcohol levels dropped more rapidly, after taking the pill, which bodes well for tests on humans, and means that there is at least one lab technician out there who has spent a lot of time getting mice drunk. For more details on the hard science of this research, check out phys.org's write-up.

And start preparing speeches to your future kids about the wars you had to fight just to get out of bed in the morning, back in the day before the hangover killer pill.

"The pill acts in a way extremely similar to the way your liver does," Lu said. "With further research, this discovery could be used as a preventative measure or antidote for alcohol intoxication."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-common-hangover.html#jCp
"The pill acts in a way extremely similar to the way your liver does," Lu said. "With further research, this discovery could be used as a preventative measure or antidote for alcohol intoxication."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-common-hangover.html#jCp
"The pill acts in a way extremely similar to the way your liver does," Lu said. "With further research, this discovery could be used as a preventative measure or antidote for alcohol intoxication."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-common-hangover.html#jCp
"The pill acts in a way extremely similar to the way your liver does," Lu said. "With further research, this discovery could be used as a preventative measure or antidote for alcohol intoxication."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-common-hangover.html#jCp
"The pill acts in a way extremely similar to the way your liver does," Lu said. "With further research, this discovery could be used as a preventative measure or antidote for alcohol intoxication."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-common-hangover.html#jCp
Yunfeng Lu, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, and his colleagues describe successfully placing two complementary enzymes in a tiny capsule to speed up the elimination of alcohol from the body.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-common-hangover.html#jCp
Yunfeng Lu, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, and his colleagues describe successfully placing two complementary enzymes in a tiny capsule to speed up the elimination of alcohol from the body.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-common-hangover.html#jCp
Yunfeng Lu, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, and his colleagues describe successfully placing two complementary enzymes in a tiny capsule to speed up the elimination of alcohol from the body.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-common-hangover.html#jCp
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