Trump Team Responds To CIA’s Claim Of Russian Involvement In Election

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"The election ended a long time ago in one of the biggest Electoral College victories in history. It’s now time to move on and 'Make America Great Again.'"

Donald Trump’s transition team has responded to the CIA claims of Russia having intervened in the 2016 election to help President-elect Donald Trump win the White House.

"These are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction," the statement said. "The election ended a long time ago in one of the biggest Electoral College victories in history. It’s now time to move on and 'Make America Great Again.'"

Citing U.S. officials briefed on the matter, The Washington Post said intelligence agencies had identified individuals with connections to the Russian government who provided thousands of hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee and others, including the chairman of Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign, to WikiLeaks.

The officials described the individuals as people known to the intelligence community who were part of a wider Russian operation to boost Trump and reduce Clinton's chances of winning the election.

"It is the assessment of the intelligence community that Russia's goal here was to favor one candidate over the other, to help Trump get elected," the Post quoted a senior U.S. official as saying. "That's the consensus view."

Meanwhile, WikiLeaks founder and editor, Julian Assange, denied his organization played any role in Russia's alleged meddling.

The president-elect has also repeatedly said there is no evidence to suggest that Russia played any role in the U.S. election.

"I don't believe it. I don't believe they interfered," Trump said in an interview for the latest issue of Time magazine.

President Barack Obama

President Barack Obama has ordered a full review into hacking aimed at influencing U.S. elections.

"The president has directed the intelligence community to conduct a full review of what happened during the 2016 election process ... and to capture lessons learned from that and to report to a range of stakeholders, to include the Congress," said homeland security adviser, Lisa Monaco.

White House spokesman Eric Schultz said the review would be a "deep dive" that would look for a pattern of such behavior over several years, as far back as the 2008 presidential election. He noted that Obama wanted the review completed under his watch.

"This is a major priority for the president of the United States," Schultz added.

Carbonated.TV
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