Saudi Female Pilots Can Now Fly High With Turkish Airlines

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Realizing the importance of women in aviation and is more than willing to accept Saudi female applicants who fail to find jobs in the Kingdom.

turkish airlines, Saudi Female Pilots

In case Saudi female pilots are unable to find employment in their country, they are more than welcome to the national flag carrier airline of Turkey.

Although Saudi authorities – both political and religious – do not allow female citizens to drive, women can still fly a plane in the conservative Islamic nation.

In 2014, Hanadi al-Hindi became the first Saudi woman to be licensed to fly in the Gulf kingdom while Yasmeen Muhammad al-Maimani has become the second to do so in the same year.

However, while there are a few female pilots reportedly training and working in Saudi Arabia, there aren’t many job opportunities for them, considering aviation is seen as a traditionally male career in the country.

Although Hindi was a licensed pilot, she could not fly within Saudi Arabia until 2014, according to BBC. It was only after she received the support of Prince Alwaleed bin Talal she was able to get the certification she needed.

"That was really difficult, being a pilot who cannot fly in her own country," she stated.

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As per a December 2015 report, the national airline of Saudi Arabia “Saudia” doesn’t offer jobs to Saudi women as flight attendants on its aircraft. It does, however, allow them to work in the female-only customer service sections in reservation offices or IT departments.

But Turkish Airlines apparently realizes the importance of women in aviation and is more than willing to accept Saudi female applicants who fail to find jobs in the Kingdom.

"There is a global shortage in number of pilots. This shortage will reach to about 100,000 pilots by 2020," Turkish Airlines General Manager Temel Kotil told the Saudi Gazette. “There are types of aircraft that does not need physical strength to fly it, for which female pilots would be suited. In addition, we prefer to employ male and female Muslim pilots.”

His offer comes almost a month later from when Royal Brunei Airlines flew its first-ever flight flown by an all-female pilot crew into Jeddah, thereby sparking international debate over Saudi women’s right to drive.

 

 

Read More: Saudi Women Can’t Drive To Work, But They Are Getting There In Droves

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