Undercover Cop Harasses Teen With Asperger's For 3 Weeks Until He Buys Marijuana

by
Owen Poindexter
Doug and Catherine Snodgrass were delighted that their 17 year-old son had finally made a good friend at Chaparral High School in Temecula, California. Now they are suing the school for a discriminatory sting operation. If you are looking for the most egregious wasted of your tax dollars, look no further.

Doug and Catherine Snodgrass were delighted that their 17 year-old son had finally made a good friend at Chaparral High School in Temecula, California. Now they are suing the school for a discriminatory sting operation. If you are looking for the most egregious wasted of your tax dollars, look no further.

“We were really thrilled because our son doesn’t have friends, and it’s so hard for him to make friends,” Doug explains.

Their son has Asperger’s, a condition on the autism spectrum that impeded his social development. All of a sudden, however, their son had a buddy named Daniel, who was texting him “around the clock.”

What Doug, Catherine and their son (whose name has been withheld over privacy concerns) didn’t know was that Daniel was actually an undercover police officer.

Daniel agitated the Snodgrass’ son constantly, first to buy him prescription medications, and then, when the son refused, to buy him marijuana. After more than 60 text messages over three weeks, the son bought half a joint from a homeless man, using $20 Daniel had given him previously.

Shortly afterward, the Snodgrass’ son and 21 other students from three schools were arrested on drug charges.

"Our son is permanently scarred from the abuse he suffered. Right now, our focus is on him, and our entire family," said his parents in a statement.

A judge, citing “extenuating circumstances” gave Doug and Catherine’s son 20 hours of community service and informal probation, after which he would not have any charges to his name. Chaparral High School, however, has doubled down on the drug sting, and has tried to expel him. A district judge blocked the school's ability to do so.

It would be one thing to target actual drug dealers in the school but this operation targeted a kid because he was lonely. That’s a sick, wasteful and discriminatory use of our tax dollars. It does a lot of harm and no good. The only way these stings are going to stop is if there's a lot of public outrage about this, so spread this story to anyone who you think ought to know.

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