Another Dictator Blocks Twitter To Cover His Misdeeds

by
Fatimah Mazhar
Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro expressed his reluctance on Monday to negotiate when his minions carried out an unwarranted raid on the opposition staff, while also further infuriating the masses with a ban on Twitter.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro expressed his reluctance on Monday to negotiate when his minions carried out an unwarranted raid on the opposition staff, while also further infuriating the masses with a ban on Twitter.

Officials from Venezuela’s Bolivarian Intelligence Service (SEBIN) conducted a raid on the headquarters of the Popular Will Party (Voluntad Popular), which is led by the main opposition leader Leopoldo López.

The intelligence men had neither a search nor an arrest warrant, according to reports. The incident was caught on surveillance cameras.

In the unverified video above, armed men can be seen trying to break down a door.

Party officials claimed the armed men were military intelligence officers who tried to forcibly remove several activists.

"This is a disregard for human rights, it is a disregard for all civil commissions: military institutions searching (the offices) of a political party," National Assembly Lawmaker Juan Guaido From “Popular Will Party” told Reuters.

Recommended: What Is Behind The Crazy Protests And Violence In Venezuela?

Initially, there were sporadic demonstrations, drawing a small number of protesters. However, opposition campaigners joined students who were rallying for the release of colleagues arrested by the police earlier this week on Venezuelan Youth Day.

At least three people – including two student protesters – were reportedly shot dead and dozens injured after pro and anti-government marches clashed in the capital city Caracas last week.

Also, three U.S. diplomats on Monday were expelled on charges of recruiting university students to lead demonstration.

Media Coverage/Internet Blocked:

The blocking of media coverage of the protests and unwarranted use of force furthermore contributed to the protesters’ anger.

According to some internet users in Venezuela, popular social media service Twitter has been suspended as well as photos of the demonstrations. Protesters are currently using proxy servers to disseminate information.

Twitter Inc. (TWTR) said the Venezuelan government blocked users’ online images as opposition groups marched through Caracas for a third day, Bloomberg reported.

The violence escalated to the worst unrest in Venezuela since the protests against President Nicolas Maduro's election in April 2013.

 

Carbonated.TV