Vogue’s Karlie Kloss Geisha Spread Slammed For Yellowface

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editors
Vogue, it seems, could not find a single model out of the approximately 130 million Japanese people in the world.

 

 

KARLIE KLOSS APARECE NA VOGUE #MARÇO2017 #AMERICANA MOSTRANDO REFERÊNCIAS #ORIENTAIS !! ISSO MESMO VOGUE US RUMO AO ORIENTE, REFERÊNCIAS VISTAS NOS DESFILES #SPRING2017. DAÍ VOCÊ ME PERGUNTA ONDE ?? ALÉM DA PRODUÇÃO E CENÁRIO ?? É SÓ JUNTAR O LÉ COM CRÉ E VER OS VOLUMES DAS MANGAS, NAS ESTAMPAS, NAS MODELAGENS QUE SÓ OS NIPÔNICOS CONSEGUEM FAZER, E ESSA ASSIMETRIA ESTÁ CADA VEZ MAIS CADA VEZ APARECENDO TAMBÉM AGORA NOS DESFILES DE #INVERNO2018 … ENTÃO FICAMOS LIGADOS EM TUDO !! POR QUE MODA É FEITA DE #DETALHES !! Photography: Mikael Jansson Model: Karlie Kloss Styling: Phyllis Posnick Hair: Julian D'Ys Make-Up: Hannah Murray Location: Ise-Shima National Park, Japan #FASHION #LOVE #SUPER #TREND #MAGAZINES #VOGUE #US #KARLIEKLOSS #MARCH #2017 #PHOTOGRAPHER #MIKAELJANSSON #SUPERMODELS #STYLING #PHYLLISPOSNICK #MODA #ORIENTE CARLOS SOARES

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UPDATE: Model Karlie Kloss issued an apology on Twitter Wednesday after facing backlash for her new spread in Vogue magazine that featured her dressed as a Japanese geisha. 

“These images appropriate a culture that is not my own and I am truly sorry for participating in a shoot that was not culturally sensitive,” she wrote. “My goal is, and always will be, to empower and inspire women. I will ensure my future shoots and projects reflect that mission. Sincerely, Karlie.”


It seems Vogue still does not understand the concept of diversity, despite the fact that it was very recently called out for its much publicized March 2017 cover.

But that’s only the cover. The inside is much worse.

An editorial inside the magazine titled “Spirited Away” (a name that just so happens to coincide with Japanese director Hayao Miyazaki's Academy Award-winning film), which was shot in Japan’s Ise-Shima National Park, features a paler-than-usual Karlie Kloss, dressed in full Japanese geisha regalia. Kloss’ blonde hair is hidden by a thick, long, black wig and she is draped in a traditional Japanese kimono.

 

HQ US Vogue, March 2017 Editorial. #karliekloss #karlieelizabethkloss #klossy

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HQ US Vogue, March 2017 Editorial. #karliekloss #karlieelizabethkloss #klossy

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HQ US Vogue, March 2017 Editorial. #karliekloss #karlieelizabethkloss #klossy

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The photo spread also insults Japanese culture as white people are wont to do whenever they shoot in other countries. They have used a “prop” — in this case, a clichéd sumo wrestler in traditional garments, often stereotyped as a culture symbol, looking ungainly next to the tall, slim and glamorous model.

 

#Vogue US March 2017 : #KarlieKloss, by Mikael Jansson

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In addition to casting a white model as a Japanese woman, there were no Japanese people credited as being involved in the spread’s creative direction.

If this was Vogue’s idea of inclusivity, it sadly left much to be desired. The magazine has been called out several times for culture appropriation and stereotyping, but it seems the people behind it are unwilling to learn their lesson. That, or they could not find a single model out of the approximately 130 million Japanese population in the world.

Read More: Is Vogue’s Strong Stance On Diversity Too Little, Too Late?

“It strikes me as an example of ‘Asian face’ or ‘yellow face,’ a problematic practice long existent in the history of racism in the U.S., where white men and women alter their facial features to ‘pass’ as ‘Orientals,’” Mire Koikari, a professor of women’s studies and affiliate of the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of Hawaii, said in an email to The Huffington Post.

 

 

 

 

 

Sadly, fashion magazines aren’t the only things that racially stereotype; the whole Hollywood industry is mired in whitewashing, as well. Scarlett Johansson was cast in a film adaption of Japanese anime “Ghost in the Shell.” Tilda Swinton was cast as the Ancient One in the “Doctor Strange” movie, a role that should have gone to a Chinese person.  Bradley Cooper, Rachel McAdams, and Emma Stone and a host of other white actors who starred in the film “Aloha” were called disrespectful of the Hawaiian culture heritage and history. Matt Damon’s lead role in the film “Great Wall” also drew backlash from people who called out to Hollywood to “to stop perpetuating the racist myth that only a white man can save the world.”

Read More: Why W Magazine's New Cover Is Facing Critical Backlash

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