What Led This West Virginia Couple To Sell Their Baby?

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A West Virginia couple tried to sell their baby to a woman for a few hundred dollars. But what exactly did they expect to buy from the money?

West Virginia Couple

A couple from Layland, West Virginia, has been arrested for allegedly trying to sell their baby daughter to feed their drug addiction, a police report reveals.

Fayette County police arrested 20-year-old Jonathan Isaac Lucas Flint and his 25-year-old fiancée Ashley Nichole Harmon, who is also the mother of the three-month old who was abandoned at a neighbor’s house last week.

The pair has now been charged with gross child neglect and creating risk of injury or death to a child.

The couple went to a home on Chestnut Knob Road on May 28 and allegedly tried to sell their baby for $1,000 dollars. When the woman, Carolyn Redden, refused to accept their offer, they reduced the price to $500. Redden did not buy the baby but promised to babysit it for a few hours while, she said, the couple went five miles to a convenient store. She says she did not know the mother of the baby but has known Flint since he was a child.

Investigators believe the couple was willing to sell their child for a drug fix.

The couple came back for the baby not a few hours later, but the next day, only to find the child was in child protective service and police were waiting to take them in.

Redden also reported she called 911 because the child would not stop crying and constantly shaking. Paramedics later told her the child was probably suffering from drug withdrawal.

“My office has been working closely with the Sheriff’s Office and Child Protective Services since we first learned of this complaint, and we intend to vigorously pursue the criminal charges filed in connection with this matter,” said Fayette County Prosecuting Attorney Larry Harrah, adding it would be a shame to add laws against selling children to the books.

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