What Can Save The GOP From Imploding Entirely?

by
Jessica Renae Buxbaum
Unity has waned in the Republican Party recently and the ideals of American conservatism have become fragmented. How can they redeem themselves?

Kevin McCarthy

House Speaker John Boehner announced his resignation and his inevitable successor Kevin McCarthy just dropped out of the race — with no likely contenders taking his place. The Republican Party is in turmoil — crying, panicking and desperately searching for a leader.

Both abrupt exits prove how completely dysfunctional the party is that no one dares to govern it.

Unity has waned in the Republican Party recently and the ideals of American conservatism have become fragmented. While the party as a whole has billowed enough into a sexist, bigoted blowhard that their presidential emblem is the crass Donald Trump, the party still has some select moderates congenially conciliatory enough to work with a Black president (while others form the House Freedom Caucus are in staunch opposition). And when McCarthy revealed the truth behind the Benghazi Committee — a cheap Republican scheme to demolish Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s popularity — he knew his controversial gaffe would damage his chances as a successful Republican leader.  He was another outlier in a party gradually being overrun by extremists.

Yet this political divide among Republicans from standard conservative to extreme right-winger has pushed them to the brink of explosion.  Harmonious unanimity between Republicans is a thing of the past.

Mashable reports that the GOP’s messiah can only be a Republican in the Oval Office, but that dreamy idea is simplistically ignorant. A Republican president is not enough to save the GOP from themselves — the party desperately needs leadership and fundamental, intrinsic change to survive.

The Democratic Party suffered in the 1980s, but before 1990 hit they managed to slowly but surely save themselves from total abomination. Instead of wallowing in denial, Democrats realized they needed to connect back to the American public. Republicans have failed to gain such grand enlightenment. The party is anti-American at this point — women, workers, Muslims, the poor and people of color — which is conspicuous to everyone except Republicans themselves. The party is out of touch with the people and once they realize that and have a leader who understands can they then mend themselves.

Yet that change may be far from sight as Republican presidential candidates don’t believe the party is broken, like Senator Marco Rubio who boldly asserted, “We don’t need a new idea,” at the 2015 Conservative Political Action Conference.

Yet not every candidate might concur:

Unfortunately for Republicans, Trump is the only one who thinks change is necessary. Yikes.

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