Should We Worry About The Deadly Flesh Eating Drug?

by
Sameera Ehteram
Increasing news of Krokodil, the alleged flesh eating drug is seriously starting to raise concern in people now. Last week Times Magazine called it the ‘World’s Most Horrifying Drug’ and announced that it is now spreading in the U.S.

All About Deadly Krokodil

Increasing news of Krokodil, the alleged flesh eating drug is seriously starting to raise concern in people now. Last week Times Magazine called it the ‘World’s Most Horrifying Drug’ and announced that it is now spreading in the U.S.

Krokodil is in the United States, and it’s a real threat.’  The words are enough to give anyone who has been seeing the recent images of the effects of the drug a serious scare.

On the other hand there are those like the Slate, who think things aren’t as bad as being projected, ‘Don’t Believe the Hype about the “Flesh-Eating” Drug Krokodil,’ they say. They liken it to the ‘Bath Salt’ scare of 2012 and dismiss it as ‘an ounce of truth and pounds of utter nonsense.’

None the less, it pays to be aware and know what it is all about. For the fact remains that more and more cases of its damages are coming forward almost every day.

What is it?

Going by the names Desomorphine, krokodi or simply crocodile, it is a homemade morphine derivative; except that it is 8-10 times more potent than morphine itself so 1 mg of the drug is has the effect of approximately 10 mg of morphine.

It is roughly made by extracting codeine from pharmaceutical products using gasoline, lye and any acidic solution such as hydrochloric acid etc. Desomorphine is then synthesized from this solution.

Where did it come from?

Desomorphine was first patented in 1932 in the United States as a derivative of morphine but only gained international attention in 2010 when Russia reported an outbreak of cases resulting from injection of the drug. It has known to be sold as a painkiller in Switzerland under the brand name Permonid.

Check out: Horrifying Video Shows A Teen On Bath Salts Crashing His Car And End Up In A Zombie-Like Aftermath

What does it do?

All About Deadly Krokodil

The horrible side effects of Krokodil include the flesh being eaten away from the inside out, rot away through gangrene and causing abscesses on the skin, which slowly turn into green, scaly lesions on the user’s skin- hence the name Krokodil.

This video shows the horrible damages of the drug:

Why do people use it?

People use it for getting a cheap and easy high. A hit of Krokodil costs about $8 compared to $25 or $30 for heroin.

A 2011 article from the Independent has an addict explain just that. “You can feel how disgusting it is when you’re doing it,” he says.“You’re dreaming of heroin, of something that feels clean and not like poison. But you can’t afford it, so you keep doing the krokodil. Until you die.”

Must read: Replacing Addiction With A Healthy Obsession

How to get help?

For any sort of drug related help or information in the US get in touch with experts on the following contacts:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: 1-800-662-HELP
  • Narcotics Anonymous World Services: 818-773-9999
  • Drug Addiction Helpline: 1-877-748-3971
  • National Alcohol and Substance Abuse Information Center: 800-784-6776 http://www.addictioncareoptions.com
  • National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence: 800-NCA-CALL or 800-475-HOPE
  • National Clearinghouse for Alcoholism and Drug Information: 800-729-6686
  • National Resource Center: 866-870-4979
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA): 800-662-HELP (4357)

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