NY Town Keeps Seal Showing White Man Strangling A Native American

by
Amna Shoaib
The residents of Whitesboro, New York voted 157-55 in favor of keeping an offensive and controversial seal in a non-binding vote on Monday night.

Update:

The residents of Whitesboro, New York voted 157-55 in favor of keeping an offensive and controversial seal in a non-binding vote on Monday night.

The village officials said the vote was informal and plan to discuss the results in a meeting on Tuesday.


Most town seals seek to celebrate the best of the community. Whitesboro, a New York upstate village, went a different route, suffice to say, by channeling the glory days of slaughtering Native Americans.

The town's seal depicts a heroic white settler in the midst of his holy conquest — strangling locals, grabbing their lands and relegating them to second-class citizens.

The controversial seal, which dates back to 1883, propelled legions of social media warriors in action after an online users posted the image on Internet.

Needless to say, Twitter descended into chaos, asking the seal be retracted. 

Many hilariously reenacted the seal.

black

The white man’s hands were initially on the native man’s throat. It was only after consideration of locals’ sentiments that the hands were moved to the shoulders.

Talk about path-breaking political correctness.

Recommended: See The Offensive Statue That Made Thandie Newton Slam Starbucks

The fate of the offensive seal will be decided this Monday, when the residents of the village will vote whether they want to keep the seal. The 3,000 residents, 94% of whom are white, recently received a copy of the seal from the local government.

Residents also have 10 designs to choose from for the new seal. However, it is unclear if the old seal, or any variation of it, was also included in these designs.

Whitesboro clerk

 

Whitesboro clerk Dana Nimey-Olney said that although many people (presumably those who still fly the Confederate flag) have called her in support of the flag, many others believe that the seal still intends to depict a native man being strangled.

Apparently, historians in Whitesboro have long claimed the seal merely shows "a friendly wrestling match that helped foster good relations" between the town's founder Hugh White and a member of the Native American Oneida tribe, calling it an "important event" in its settling.

The seal is currently displayed on the town's trucks, highway equipment and official documents. Although after Monday’s vote, it would hopefully be replaced by something less racist and controversial. 

Read More: White Woman Dons Blackface To Save African Tribes — Fails Miserably

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