Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange Walks Out Of CNN Interview

Whistleblowing website Wikileaks' founder, Julian Assange walked out of a CNN interview in London after the interviewer kept asking about Julian's personal life, his relationship with employees and the legal injunctions in Swiss court for sexual assault.

(From Carbonated TVs Editor's desk)

Whistleblowing website Wikileaks' founder, Julian Assange walked out of a CNN interview in London after the interviewer kept asking about Julian's personal life, his relationship with employees and the legal injunctions in Swiss court for sexual assault.

The CNN interviewer, Atika Shubert was seemingly interviewing Assange over the leak of 400,000 classified documents pertaining to the Iraq war, and 100,000 civillian deaths. However, Shubert was after a different story altogether. She pressed Assange about his personality conflicts which was cited by one former Wikileaks staffer as a reason for quitting. Assange took offence and immediately tried to put the matter to bed by saying that it is not an interesting story, but that he is the "lightning rod" for Wikileaks, drawing the media pressure away from the organization.

Shubert was not done yet and she moved on to the sexual assault cases registered against Assange in Switzerland. Assange cut her short with "I am not going to talk about that . ." As Shubert further pressed him he said that "this interview is about something else " and "are you going to contaminate this extremely serious interview with my personal life".

Shubert had smelled blood and kept at it, however she was cut short as Asssange got up, removed his microphone, and left the studio.

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange leaves a news conference on the internet release of secret documents about the Iraq War in London. Wikileaks released nearly 400,000 classified U.S. files on the Iraq war on Friday, some detailing gruesome cases of prisoner abuse by Iraqi forces that the U.S. military knew about but did not seem to investigate.

(CNN)

WikiLeaks Editor-in-Chief Julian Assange is defending the group's recent leak and said it poses no real risk to soldiers or civilians in Iraq.

"This material doesn't mention any soldiers' names, doesn't mention any names of Iraqi civilians," he told CNN's Larry King Monday.

"The only thing at risk here is the reputations of the politicians and bureaucrats that put these soldiers into harm's way -- and who put Iraqis into harm's way," he said.

Last week, the whistle-blower website published some 400,000 classified documents detailing the war in Iraq.

They showed, Assange said, the deaths of 109,000 people, including soldiers and civilians. The release also revealed that roughly 15,000 more Iraqi civilians died during the conflict than previously thought, he said.

The Pentagon has denounced the leak and has warned it could put U.S. troops in greater danger -- an accusation Assange denied.

Earlier this year, WikiLeaks released more than 70,000 documents related to the war in Afghanistan. The website was heavily criticized then by the U.S. government, the military and some human rights groups for failing to withhold civilians' names, potentially putting them at risk of retaliation.

Assange said WikiLeaks redacted the new round of documents, which included 391,832 reports.

He also addressed an interview he gave last week to CNN's Atika Shubert. Assange walked out after she started to ask questions about investigations in Sweden, where he has been accused in separate cases of rape and molestation.

King, who appeared to be watching footage of the old interview, momentarily thought Assange had walked out on him.

"I didn't walk off Larry just then, but perhaps I should," Assange said.

He called such claims false and urged media groups not to conflate the content of the leak with "any sort of tabloid journalism."

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