Woman Reports Rape, Cops Respond By Sexually Assaulting Her

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Thanks to rape culture, police’s handling of reported rapes has escalated from carelessness to sexually assaulting the victims themselves.

NYPD car

Rape survivors often fear that their sexual assault reports will not be taken seriously and thus swept under the rug by law enforcement. Yet thanks to rape culture, police’s handling of reported rapes has escalated from carelessness to sexually assaulting the victims themselves.

A 25-year-old woman is suing the New York Police Department for $3 million after two of its Special Victims Unit officers handling her case took her out for drinks which culminated in one cop allegedly groping her.

The unnamed woman initially reported an assault by an acquaintance that occurred on January 2013 to the NYPD in June of that year.  In July, Lt. Adam Lamboy and Detective Lucasz Skorzewski interviewed the woman in Seattle. They then encouraged her to grab lunchtime drinks on Seattle’s waterfront with them. In response to her reservations of daytime drinking, the officers joked, “We’ll protect you.”

The perceived “harmless” lunch turned into 10 hours of bar-hopping, where one of the officers — in a deceptive ploy to appear charming — remarked to the woman, “you’re my favorite victim!”

The officers then convinced the woman to crash at their hotel. The woman stayed in Skorzewski’s bed while he slept on the couch. But at 10 a.m., Skorzewski quietly snuck under the sheets and kissed and groped her for nearly a half hour before she ran off to the shower crying.

Skorzewski told her the assault “can’t leave this room.” In New York, he made numerous excuses to see her to discuss the investigation but instead repeatedly reminded her to keep the assault a secret.

The detective sent her hundreds of text messages saying “he never bonded with a victim like this before,” and confessed "if his wife found out…it would be over."

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The woman’s report was eventually closed without explanation in November 2013. The NYPD was made aware of the officers’ misconduct and in December 2014, the officers were “disciplined.” Lamboy was transferred to a different unit and his pay reduced. Skorzewski was demoted from detective to patrol officer. Although Lamboy retired, neither of the officers lost their jobs.

“She was a victim made to feel re-victimized by the very people she sought for help: the police. The experience left her feeling exploited, helpless and alone,” the woman’s attorney, Christopher Galiardo, said.

The case is an uncomfortable reminder not only of how law enforcement woefully mishandle rape cases but also the breadth and depth of police brutality — and how easily they can get away with their assault.

Read more: Is This Video Of Sons Watching Moms Get Catcalled Really Effective?

Banner photo credit: Twitter: @PUTigersUpdate 

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