Woman Wins Fake Facebook Profile Case Against DEA

Hana LaRock
The Justice Department agreed to pay money to a woman after the DEA created a fake Facebook profile in her name.

The DEA settles a case in which they were sued for making a fake Facebook profile of a woman to catch other suspects. However, they admitted no wrongdoing in their act and said it was justified. 

The woman disagrees and apparently so did the Justice Department, which is agreeing to pay her $134,000, according to Arstechnica.

The DEA used pictures from the woman's mobile phone to create the phony Facebook profile and use it to help catch other drug suspects connected to an alleged drug ring. The woman, who went under the name Sondra Prince, was under probation and six months house arrest when the situation happened in 2010. When she discovered what the DEA was doing, she sued.

Although 'Prince' has won the case, the DEA said their actions were for "legitimate law enforcement purposes" and the government said nothing was done wrong here in this situation.

This is not the first time someone got in trouble for using a fake profile. In 2009, a woman created a fake MySpace account which she used to cyber bully a girl who eventually committed suicide. 

The phony profile used by the DEA was active for at least 3 months in 2010, but Facebook took it down as per their policy against imposters.