iPhone Manufacturer Treats Its Workers As Slaves

by
editors
The iPhones and iPads we use are manufactured at the cost of labor abuse.

The Taiwanese company that makes circuit boards for Apple iPhones and iPads forces its laborers to work in atrocious conditions akin to slavery, says a report prepared by the Institute for Global Labour and Human Rights.

The NGO, in its report, claims that Zhen Ding Technology Holding's factory unit in Shenzen, China makes its staff members work 65-hour a week, has plywood beds for them to sleep on and enforces its commands via its brigade of highhanded security officers.

The working conditions of the 15,000 or so sleep deprived laborers is so poor that they fall asleep during their lunch breaks. The fruit of the hardships they bear are circuit boards which are then sold to Apple and packaged in the American-company's newest and flashiest gadgets.

Explaining Zhen Ding's staff management model is one unnamed worker, who said: “The production goal increases every day. Today we met the production goal, and then it goes up tomorrow. It goes up until we can’t finish the job.”

After The Huffington Post did a story on the report, an Apple spokesperson revealed that it is aware of Zhen Ding's habit of tweaking payroll records to hide excessive overtime, which apparently, is "a core violation of our Supplier Code of Conduct -- the most serious breach of compliance."

"Apple is committed to ensuring safe and fair working conditions throughout our supply chain," the spokesman added. "We drive compliance with our code of conduct through far-reaching audits, transparent reporting and a strong respect for human rights that is central to the way we do business."

It was also ensured that the company will not award new contracts to the Thai manufacturer unless it eliminates improves the poor working conditions of its staff, which Apple came to know of via annual audits.

Zhen Ding has so far refrained from any comments, either on the allegations in the report or the payroll irregularities cited by Apple spokesperson.

 

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